ODMA 2017 | VISION SUMMIT
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VISION SUMMIT

ODMA17’s Vision Summit will take place on Friday 7 July 2017 and will see the most exciting line up of acclaimed international speakers in ODMA Fair Conference history.

Speakers include Rolando Toyos from the USA, developer of Intense Pulsed Light for dry eye disease and Professor Minas Coroneo AO, who introduced trypan blue (VisionBlue) as an ocular dye and is developing next generation intraocular lenses and glaucoma shunts (CyPass) as well as a bionic eye.

 

Other speakers, all world leaders in their field are: Professor Peter McCluskey, Director of the Save Sight Institute at Sydney Eye Hospital and expert on inflammatory eye disease and Professor Fiona Stapleton, whose research areas include the epidemiology of lens-related disease, ocular microbiology, bacterial resistance, contact lens care systems, and ocular defence mechanisms .

 

Vision Summit is designed to deliver the latest developments in eyecare with a focus on quality, with 24 CPD points available for optometrists (all therapeutic).

 

Cost: $399 inc gst

Online registration now closed.  To book, please visit the Registration Counter on arrival at the Fair.

Tickets non-refundable

 


PROGRAM

 

Registration
7.30am – 8.00am

 

Non-refractive laser treatments of the ocular surface
8.00am – 8.40am
Professor Minas T. Coroneo AO. BSc(Med), MB BS, MSc Syd, MD, MS UNSW
FRACS, FRANZCO. Professor and Chairman, Department of Ophthalmology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

 

Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy promised a new era of diagnostic imaging and successes will be illustrated and limitations reviewed. In relation to cosmetic treatments, the role of lasers in managing pterygium, pinguecula, conjunctival naevi, application of corneal tattoos will be illustrated. Therapeutic aspects of laser treatment will include management of biofilms/infectious crystalline keratopathy, recurrent erosion syndrome, trichiasis, inducing punctal stenosis/occlusion in dry eye syndrome, minimally invasive eyelid surgery and laser ÒweldingÓ techniques. Experimental aspects of laser pterygium surgery will be described and safety aspects of laser treatments explored.

 

Knowledge of these lesser-known treatment modalities may increase management options that patients can be offered. At the completion of this lecture participants should be able to recognize the potential application of less well-known laser techniques for a range of ocular surface diseases; recognize that for certain conditions such as pterygium, for which laser treatment has been advocated in the past, that there is no evidence of efficacy; and appreciate the advances made in experimental techniques such as creating conjunctival flaps in pterygium surgery and tissue welding techniques.

 

Update on cataract and pterygium surgery
8.40am – 9.20am
Professor Minas T. Coroneo AO. BSc(Med), MB BS, MSc Syd, MD, MS UNSW
FRACS, FRANZCO. Professor and Chairman, Department of Ophthalmology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

 

Pterygium, OSSN and cataract are prevalent conditions in Australia yet there are controversies in relation to their management. Advances in management techniques will be reviewed.

Our aims in pterygium surgery are to minimize recurrence rates, restore normality to the ocular surface, achieve excellent cosmesis and to minimize induced refractive error. Means of achieving this will be reviewed a case put for early intervention.

OSSN has in the past been seen as a surgical disease, despite relatively high rates of recurrence in long term follow up. Advances in the medical management of this condition are reviewed and a case made for this to be the predominant treatment modality.

While modern cataract surgery is the most successful replacement procedure ever developed in medicine, refinements continue to be attempted and a case for early intervention made. An increasingly prevalent medium to long-term complication is intraocular lens dislocation/subluxation and pathophysiology and management will be discussed.

At the completion of this lecture participants should be able to identify the principles underlying modern pterygium surgery and the evidence base for use of excision and reconstruction of free autoconjunctival grafts; understand the shift from surgical to medical management of OSSN, involving the use of topical interferon in initial treatment; and appreciate the long-term risk of intraocular lens subluxation/dislocation following cataract surgery and what is involved in management of this condition.

 

How I manage patients with uveitis
9.20am – 10.00am
Professor Peter McCluskey, Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology & Eye Health and Director of Save Sight Institute, Clinical Ophthalmology & Eye Health, Central Clinical School, Save Sight Institute

 

This presentation will give an overview of the causes of uveitis and highlight how uveitis specialists use clinical assessment and selected investigations to sort out patients presenting with uveitis. A short overview of the principles of treatment and new drug therapies will be included. Delegates will gain an appreciation of the diverse spectrum of potential causes of uveitis; have an understanding of the acute and severe potential for vision loss and serious systemic illnesses that may be associated with uveitis; have an understanding of the principles of clinical assessment used to sort out patients with uveitis; and have an appreciation for the principle therapies used to treat patients with severe uveitis.

 

Multimodal Imaging in patients with uveitis
10.00am – 10.40am
Professor Peter McCluskey, Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology & Eye Health and Director of Save Sight Institute, Clinical Ophthalmology & Eye Health, Central Clinical School, Save Sight Institute

 

This presentation will be a series of clinical vignettes that show how uveitis specialists use different imaging techniques to diagnose, assess and manage patients with uveitis and related disorders. Imaging technologies covered will include: digital imaging & Optos wide field imaging, fundus autofluorescence, wide field fluorescein angiography, and OCT imaging. Delegates will gain an understanding of the range of imaging studies used in patient with uveitis; have an understanding of the critical role of multimodal imaging in evaluating patients with uveitis; and have an understanding of the fundamental role of OCT imaging in diagnosis and management of patients with uveitis.

 

Morning Tea
10.40am – 11.00am

 

Intense Pulse Light with OPT for Dry Eye Disease Treatment
11.00am – 12.20pm
Rolando Toyos, M.D. (USA), Medical Director and Founder of Toyos Clinic, which has been recognised as one the fastest growing companies in the United States by Inc. Magazine

 

This presentation will go over the history, technology, treatment protocol, and learned tips of Intense Pulse Light IPL for Dry Eye Disease DED. In particular, Toyos will be covering the evolution of the IPL technology and how the OPT has improved outcomes. Participants will be able to explain the technology of IPL & mechanisms of action IPL in treating DED; have specific knowledge of the significant published studies on IPL; understand the differences with OPT technology; and have tips to incorporate the treatment in their practice.

 

 

Lunch
12.20pm – 2.20pm

 

Can we make contact lens wear safer?
2.20pm – 2.50pm
Professor Fiona Stapleton, Professor and Head of School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

 

Corneal infection is a rare but potentially severe complication of contact lens wear. More severe infections are frequently associated with environmental microorganisms and, intriguingly, the spectrum of causative organisms differs from corneal infections in the absence of contact lens wear. This presentation will discuss the epidemiology of contact lens related corneal infection, including modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors including recent evidence for the genetics of disease, the importance of avoiding water contact with lenses, recent findings with cosmetic contact lenses and strategies for both the prevention of disease and limiting morbidity. Delegates will gain an appreciation of the differences in causative organisms in contact lens and non-contact lens related disease and why this may occur; and be able to outline the major modifiable and non-modifiable related risk factors for microbial keratitis, particularly for sere disease and make appropriate recommendations to limit disease severity in contact lens wearers.

 

Dry eye – who gets it and what causes it?
2.50pm – 3.20pm
Professor Fiona Stapleton, Professor and Head of School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

 

Dry is a common reason for seeking eye care, accounting for up to 25% of ophthalmic consults. Studies in Asia have indicated a higher prevalence of disease, although the underlying reasons remain unclear. MGD represents the most common cause of dry eye. Early evidence from genetics studies indicate that there is heritability component to the disease and shared genetic factors with chronic pain syndromes. This presentation will discuss the societal impact of dry eye, who is predominantly affected, what remains unknown and new learnings which might assist in our management of dry eye disease. Delegates will gain an appreciation of the impact of age, sex and race on rates and impact of dry eye; and understand modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors to help assist in the management of disease.

 

Diabetic macular oedema – detecting patients who respond to management with anti-VEGF therapy, and outcomes
3.20pm – 3.50pm

Professor Gerald Liew, MBBS, MMed, PhD, FRANZCO, Clinical Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, conjoint Associate Professor, South West Sydney Medical School, University of New South Wales, Australia, Staff Specialist Ophthalmologist, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia

 

This presentation will assist in understand how to detect diabetic macula oedema, determine who respond to management with Anti-VegF therapy, appreciate the outcomes from treatment.

 

Afternoon Tea
3.50pm – 4.10pm

 

Neovascular AMD – early detection by optometrists and issues with long-term anti-VEGF therapy
4.10pm – 4.40pm

Professor Gerald Liew, MBBS, MMed, PhD, FRANZCO, Clinical Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, conjoint Associate Professor, South West Sydney Medical School, University of New South Wales, Australia, Staff Specialist Ophthalmologist, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia

 

This presentation will help to understand how to detect neovascular AMD, understand the treatment options and what their long term implications for the patient are

 

The Science of Corneal Crosslinking in 2017
4.40pm – 5.20pm
Professor Stephanie Watson, Bsc(Med), MMBS, FRANZCO, PhD, Professor, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney
Chair, Ophthalmic Research Institute of Australia, Chair, RANZCO Public Health Committee

 

Corneal cross linking is increasingly being performed to prevent progression of corneal ectasia. It has traditionally been done using a method known as the ‘Dresden protocol’, variants on this protocol are now in use in clinical practise. This talk will highlight what is currently involved in the cross linking procedure and what the outcomes of the procedure are. ‘The Save Sight Keratoconus Registry’, which has data from 1700 eyes with keratoconus and treatment data from cross-linking procedures performed across Australia and New Zealand, will be featured.

 

Stem cells and the Eye: Where are we now?
5.20pm – 6.00pm
Professor Stephanie Watson, Bsc(Med), MMBS, FRANZCO, PhD, Professor, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney
Chair, Ophthalmic Research Institute of Australia, Chair, RANZCO Public Health Committee

 

Stem cells have important roles in every day maintenance of the eye and in repair following injury or disease. In recent years, new findings from research and the clinic have vastly increased our knowledge of where they are, what they are doing, and how we can see and replace them. In clinical practise, stem cell deficiency produces recognisable disease patterns and its correct management can restore vision. In Europe, stem cells for the cornea are available as a commercial product, with further research stem cell therapies may become routinely available for other conditions including cataract.

 

* PROGRAM CORRECT AT 15 JUNE 2017 – SUBJECT TO CHANGE